February 2011
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Eliminating slide guards | Safe Solutions

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Eliminating slide guards

OSHA rescinds its longtime fall-protection directive

by Harry Dietz
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Does your company perform work on roofs with slopes of 4-in-12 (18 degrees) to 8-in-12 (34 degrees)? If so, you need to know about the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) recent decision to rescind a 15-year-old directive that allows slide guard use in certain residential roofing applications.

Cancellation of STD 03-00-001, "Interim Fall Protection Compliance Guidelines for Residential Construction," became effective in December 2010 with enforcement delayed until June 16, 2011. As a result, roofing contractors will have to implement conventional fall-protection methods for most residential roofing projects.

Changes

The use of slide guards was allowed under the original directive for fall protection for roofing work on residential roofs with slopes of 8-in-12 (34 degrees) or less and eave heights of 25 feet or less. Conventional fall protection, such as guardrails, safety nets or personal fall-arrest systems (PFAs), was required for roof heights exceeding 25 feet or roof slopes greater than...



Web exclusive: Click below for more information.
NRCA's Special Report and webinar addressing OSHA's cancellation of STD 03-00-001



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