December 2005
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Additional photos regarding Hurricane Katrina damage

Additional photos regarding Hurricane Katrina damage

Photo 1. Kiln, Miss. Located only 3 to 4 miles (5 to 6 km) from St. Louis Bay, this house experienced water surge damage. It also experienced some of the highest winds because of its proximity to the coast where Katrina made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane. Only a small portion of the newer asphalt shingles were blown off along the leading edge of the winds.

Photo 2. This structure in Kiln, Miss., was far enough north—about 5 miles (8 km) north of St. Louis Bay—to avoid storm surge. The metal panel roof fared well; however, the gable-end wall did not.

Photo 3. This house, located east of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast along Route 43. The metal panel roof system fared well.

Photo 4. This house in Plantation Oaks subdivision east of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast along Route 43. The newer laminated asphalt shingles fared well. The gable-end siding did not. The gutter along the west edge of the carport was damaged during the hurricane.

Photo 5. This house in Plantation Oaks subdivision east of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast along Route 11. The metal panel roof system fared well except where the chimney was blown over and breached the roof system. It appears the chimney's masonry fell through the roof and soffit/ceiling above the porch.

Photo 6. This house is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast along Route 43 and is located in Plantation Oaks subdivision east of Picayune, Miss. The newer asphalt shingle roof system fared well. The siding was damaged during the hurricane.

Photo 7. This house east of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast along Route 43. The newer asphalt shingle roof system fared well except for the hip shingles above the television satellite dish.

Photo 8. In the southwestern part of Picayune, Miss., this house is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast. The three-tab asphalt shingles were racked, and about 50 percent of the shingles blew off.

Photo 9. This house, located in the southwestern part of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast. The newer laminated asphalt shingles fared well.

Photo 10. This building in the central business district of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast. The low-slope asphalt roof system appeared to fare well relative to the high winds. However, the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning units toppled during the storm, likely damaging the roof system. A 20-foot (6-m) portion of the edge metal/gutter system blew off.

Photo 11. This structure, which is north of the central business district in Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast. The metal panel roof system fared well except for the east gable along the north wall and west gable on the extended part of the north wall.

Photo 12. This structure is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast and north of the central business district of Picayune, Miss. The metal panel roof system fared well except for the gable end above the open air balcony/covered walkway, which is believed to have been pressurized or blown in directly.

Photo 13. This structure in the central business district of Picayune, Miss., is about 25 miles (40 km) north of the coast. The metal coping was installed over the original coping caps without any face fasteners, clips or cleats. Portions of the coping blew off during the hurricane.

Photo 14. This structure along Route 11 in Mississippi is about 30 miles (48 km) north of the coast. The metal panel roof system fared well. The failure of the roof assembly was the attachment of the roof structure to the supporting walls and columns. This was a dramatic, classic example of internal pressure causing the roof assembly to fail.

Photo 15. This structure along Route 11 in Mississippi is about 30 miles (48 km) north of the coast. This is the opposite side of the building shown in Photo 15. The metal panel roof system remains attached to the wood structure.

Photo 16. This structure, located north of Picayune, Miss., along Route 11 is about 30 miles (48 km) north of the coast. This is the northwest corner of the building in Photos 15 and 16 and is the point where the roof assembly's failure was initiated. The fans and louver allowed high winds to enter the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning equipment room, which created internal pressure and lifted the corner of the roof assembly. Once the roof assembly lifted, the high winds folded it over upon itself. Close inspection of the top of the masonry wall showed a lack of mechanical attachment (J bolts), which should have helped secure the roof assembly to the top of the wall.

Photo 17. In Ocean Springs, Miss., along Route 90, this structure is about 1 mile (2 km) north of the coast. The metal panel roof system fared well except for a 20-foot- (6-m-) long section of fascia metal that was part of the roof over a drive-through portion of the building.

Photo 18. This structure in Ocean Springs, Miss., is about 1 mile (2 km) north of the coast. This structure is just north of the building in Photo 17. The asphalt shingles consistently were damaged on the west sides of the firewalls. Turbulence caused by the high winds traveling over the firewalls appears to have damaged the asphalt shingles.

Photo 19. In Ocean Springs, Miss., less than 100 yards (91 m) from the coast, this home was damaged significantly from storm surge. The newer three-tab asphalt shingles fared relatively well considering this home is located where the hurricane's winds were some of the highest.

Photo 20. About 200 yards (183 m) from the coast in Ocean Springs, Miss., this structure was damaged significantly from storm surge. There was no observed roof system damage even though this structure is located where the hurricane's winds were some of the highest.

Photo 21. About 3 miles (5 km) from the coast in Gulfport, Miss., this structure's south-facing elevation was damaged at the eave edge; the gutter was damaged because of high winds.

Photo 22. This entire complex of apartment buildings in Gulfport, Miss., received significant damage to its asphalt shingle roof systems. It appears that some of the roof deck is missing because the second-floor balconies were pressurized from the underside.


This Web exclusive information is a supplement to Hurricane Katrina: observations from the field.

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